view original data file (txt)

 

visual analogy:

continuous color change

discontinuous color change

central park climate from 1901-2001

Since the turn of the last century, Central Park has been a place where daily maximum and minimum temperature and precipitation values for New York City have been placed on record. These two sonification compositions have been created with this actual recorded information. Will the next 100 years sound similar or dramatically different?

sample 1

play (mp3)
3 minutes of a 15 minute composition

In this version, the sound of the temperature is continuous and represented by a two harmonizing low tones (one for each: max and min temperature). You can hear the temperatures rise and fall yearly, sounding like a whistling wind.

The precipitation is represented by both the sound of 'noise' with an increase in loudness mapped directly to the data value and the pitch of a clear tone mapped directly to the data value. You can hear this tone in the background chaotically changing in pitch.

sample 2

play(mp3)
3 minutes of a 15 minute composition

In this version, the separation between the sound of temperatures is discontinuous, similar to a graph where there is a clear delineation between colors. If the temperature reaches a certain threshold, there is a dramatic jump in the pitch. This creates an obvious sound signal when the temperature reaches a certain level.

scaling temperature:
< 25 low tone (minimum temperature)
> 25 very high pitched 'screech' sounds (maximum temperature)

The precipitation is represented by the sound of 'noise' only with an increase in loudness mapped directly to the data value. This sounds like the sound of the static on the radio that sometimes occurs on a cloudy day.

In both compositions, the overall speed is determined by the temperature, moving continuously slower with lower temperatures and faster with higher temperatures at a rate between 1 and 200 milliseconds delay between data values.